Collecting postcards from the Middle East

British Museum blog

Postcard with a view of a camel train, AdenSt John Simpson, curator, British Museum

Just send us a postcard! This short catchphrase is poised to enter history across the world; today, mobile phones, text messages, emails, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram are the media used to help connect people and share images and experiences.

The postcard is not quite dead but it is certainly endangered and it’s for that reason that we have decided to formally add them to the list of objects that we collect, register, acknowledge donor details, scan and upload onto the British Museum collection online.

Moreover, postcards are very evocative objects. The images are loaded with significance and capture moments in time, and this applies equally to cards showing places, landscapes and people. Indeed, the more postcards one has of a particular place, the more powerful they become in charting its history and exploring the practical issues of how the view was arrived at…

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We are the Chicago Sun-Times photography department

We are the Chicago Sun-Times photography department

We are the Chicago Sun-Times photography department

After the Chicago Sun-Times laid off its entire photography department, CNN commissioned former staffer Brian Powers to shoot this series of portraits of his colleagues holding something meaningful from their careers. Several of the photographers said they feel like they lost more than just a job.

Short Video: David’s battlefield up close

Bible, Archaeology, Travel with Luke Chandler

Since this is our last year to excavate in the Elah valley in Israel, I made a short, up-close video of David’s battlefield with Goliath. You can “be there” as we go over the events of 1 Samuel 17.

 

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Project #1: Archaeological Dig at Ashkelon, Israel

Trent and Rebekah reporting on the archaeological excavations at Ashkelon in Israel

Trent and Rebekah

Rebekah posted a few days ago about an upcoming adventure.  I look at this more as a project, actually.  We have three projects coming soon, of which this is the first.  We thought these projects might interest you, so here we are.

First off, our apologies for the misleading last post.  We truly intended to continue posting continuing content concerning history, culture, art, nature, and such.  We’ve been busy since the last trip and we just could not make the time for it (as we were busy with these projects, among other things of life).

So, what’s the project?  Let’s say you are greatly interested in ancient history and archaeology, particularly in the timeframe of Biblical settings. What is one of the best ways to learn about this history and archaeology?  Rebekah and I asked this question many months ago and the answer landed us (figuratively and literally) on the…

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Praying Atheists – Washington Post

Praying Atheists – Washington Post

Praying Atheists – Washington Post

By  — 24 June 2013

Some excerpts:

New research on atheists by the Pew Research Center shows a range of beliefs. Eighteen percent of atheists say religion has some importance in their life, 26 percent say they are spiritual or religious and 14 percent believe in “God or a universal spirit.” Of all Americans who say they don’t believe in God — not all call themselves “atheists” — 12 percent say they pray.

………….

Atheists deny religion’s claim of a supernatural god but are starting to look more closely at the “very real effect” that practices such as going to church, prayer and observance of a Sabbath have on the lives of the religious, said Paul Fidalgo, a spokesman for the secular advocacy group the Center for Inquiry. “That’s a big hole in atheist life,” he said. “Some atheists are saying, ‘Let’s fill it.’ Others are saying, ‘Let’s not.’ ”

…..

Gordon Melton, a historian of new American religions, said that it’s only been in the past decade that atheists have become organized and the range of their views has therefore become more known. Sociologists have also just begun asking more complex questions about faith to a wider range of respondents.

Stanley Cup winning ‘Hawks pile on praise for Crawford

Corey Crawford is a class act! Really tired of hearing about how all the other teams’ goalies are (were) so much better.

ProHockeyTalk

Since the start of the season, goaltender Corey Crawford has been arguably the most commonly doubted man on the Chicago Blackhawks’ roster. That was to be expected after his rough 2011-12 campaign, but it seemed at times like no amount of success could fully reverse that perception.

Whenever he had a rough game, the fear would be that it was a sign that the other shoe was dropping. Even as recently as last week, there were questions about whether he should be the team’s starter following his rough outing in Chicago’s 6-5 overtime victory in Game 4.

“I got a question the other day which kind of was surprising, ‘Who’s going to play your next game?’ It was obvious who’s playing our next game because he was the reason we were playing the next game,” Blackhawks coach Joel Quenneville said in a CSN Chicago report.

“The scrutiny that he was…

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Rask in disbelief after ‘shocking’ Chicago comeback

Well-deserved — really tired of hearing about how the other guys’ goalies are so much better.

ProHockeyTalk

What just happened?

With 59 seconds left in Game 6 of the Stanley Cup Final, that’s all anybody could ask.

Dave Bolland had just scored what would prove to be the Cup-winning goal.

And 17 seconds earlier, Bryan Bickell had equalized with his goalie on the bench.

Really…what just happened?

It marked one of the most impossible, improbable and incredible comebacks in Stanley Cup Final history. When the dust settled, the Blackhawks had erased a 2-1 deficit — at TD Garden, no less — and flat-out stunned the Bruins.

For confirmation, ask Tuukka Rask.

“It’s shocking,” the Bruins goalie said after the game. “Sometimes momentum builds, and that’s what happened.”

The Blackhawks became the first club to win a Stanley Cup-clinching game in regulation time by overcoming a one-goal deficit in the final two
minutes.

[nbcsports_video src=http://player.theplatform.com/p/BxmELC/nbcsportsembed/embed/select/jDNZBeQDCLuC service=rsn_iframe width=590 height=332]

The Finnish netminder was then asked if there was…

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